Day Trip to Sintra Planning the Perfect Lisbon to Sintra Tour by JetSettingFools.com

Day Trip to Sintra, Portugal: Planning a Perfect Lisbon to Sintra Tour

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Whimsical and fanciful, Sintra, Portugal is a world away from the hustle and bustle of Lisbon. Yet, the Lisbon-to-Sintra train whisks passengers between the two cities in less than an hour. While there are numerous destinations for day trips from Lisbon, taking a Sintra tour ranks as a top city escape. Organized Lisbon tours offer an easy (but sometimes expensive) way to visit Sintra. However, visitors on a budget – and those who simply like touring at their own pace – can plan their own day trip to Sintra with this Sintra Trip Guide.

 

Things To Do in Sintra

For centuries, Sintra has been a retreat used by Lisbon’s elite; they built the region’s sprawling estates and fairytale castles that attract so many visitors today. The historic and cultural landscape of Sintra has been so well-preserved that it has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visiting the beautiful palaces, historic forts and planned parks are the top Sintra things to do.

 

What To See in Sintra

The Sintra region extends roughly 11 miles from the Old Town Sintra village to the picturesque coastline – and there are historic attractions scattered throughout the mountainous, tree-covered land. The top things to see in Sintra, however, are within close proximity to the Sintra Station (which makes it very convenient for visitors on Lisbon day trips).

The top attractions included in this outlined Lisbon to Sintra trip are: Pena Palace and Park, Moorish Castle, Regaleira Estate, the National Palace of Sintra and the historic Old Town.

 

This post contains everything you need to know to tour Sintra on your own! Bookmark, Pin or Save this information so that you can easily access it during your trip!

 

Why We Created A One Day in Sintra Guide

On our first Lisbon to Sintra day trip, we failed miserably. Without doing prior research, we arrived late in the afternoon without a clue of what to do in Sintra. We spotted the cylindrical cones of the Sintra Palace and used them as a beacon to guide our way into the heart of the city. However, when we arrived at the palace doors, we learned it was already closed for the day. We wandered aimlessly through the Old Town, popping into a few souvenir shops and stopping at a café for a glass of wine. At dusk, we followed the hordes of people (“Where did they all come from?” we wondered) back to the Sintra train station to catch the next Lisbon train. To sum it up: It was the worst planned day trip to Sintra…ever.

 

Planning a Sintra Tour from Lisbon

On a return trip to Lisbon, we decided to attempt another Sintra day tour. This time, however, we were much better prepared. We researched the top things to do in Sintra, Portugal a few days prior to our trip. We made a list of Sintra sightseeing destinations and consulted the Lisbon to Sintra train timetable.

Because of our detailed planning, our second Sintra day tour from Lisbon went off without a hitch. Not only did we see the highlights and enjoy the nature, but our trip was incredibly affordable when compared to the cost of a guided Lisbon-Sintra tour. We are sharing our detailed Sintra day trip itinerary to help other travelers better enjoy their day trip to Sintra from Lisbon.

 

10 Free Things To Do in Lisbon, Portugal by JetSettingFools.com

10 Free Things To Do in Lisbon, Portugal

 

How To Plan the Perfect Day Trip to Sintra

Before we jump into the outline of places to visit in Sintra on a one-day trip, we need to cover a few important details. In addition to getting to Sintra, we cover information on what to bring, Sintra transport and admission tickets to sights. Planning ahead is key to having a successful one-day trip from Lisbon. Throughout the post and in a summary at the end, we include details on the price of a DIY Sintra tour. This information was valid at the time of our trip in 2019. 

 

What You Will Need for Your Sintra, Portugal Day Trip

Sintra trips from Lisbon are a lot more enjoyable if you are prepared with necessities. Don’t visit Sintra, Portugal without these essential items!

Walking Shoes

With hilly terrain and expansive sights, comfortable and functional walking shoes are a requirement. Hiking boots are not necessary, but a good pair of shoes with a slip-resistant sole are! I like these shoes by Columbia and Kris prefers these by Merrell.

Water Bottle

Make sure to bring plenty of water with you; we recommend carrying a liter of water per person. There are some places to refill water bottles (but look for signs to see if the water is potable!). And, they sell water at all the sights, but for a ridiculous upcharge. We saw a small bottle of water in a vending machine for €1.70.

Sunscreen, Wide Brimmed Hat, Umbrella

Many of the top sights in Sintra are outdoors, which means you need to prepare for the elements. In the summertime, be sure to bring sunscreen and a wide-brimmed travel hat. In the winter and spring, bring a travel umbrella or packable rain jacket.

Camera

Sintra is photogenic – so don’t forget your camera! Although phone cameras can capture the beauty of the town, it’s better to use a real camera. The hill-top castles and forts are stunning from afar…and are best photographed with a zoom lens! We travel with a DSLR Canon Rebel, but for something less bulky, we recommend the Canon PowerShot

Picnic Lunch

There are plenty of places to eat in Sintra, but you can save time and money by packing a picnic lunch. Get basic items – like fruit, bread, meat and cheese – from the grocery store in Lisbon and have a picnic in Sintra. We found an incredible place to eat our picnic lunch: in the tallest turret at the Pena Palace – the location couldn’t be beat!

Day Pack

It’s best to carry a day pack for your trip so that you can keep your items secure. Like in every tourist-driven town, pickpockets are a problem…so it’s best to keep your valuables zipped up! In addition to the above-mentioned items, you will need a place for your wallet, tickets and any souvenirs you pick up along the way. We also recommend bringing a small first-aid kit – just a few band-aids, pain relief pills and allergy meds. You wouldn’t want a  headache or pollen ruining your day!

Travel Insurance

We always recommend investing in travel insurance – but it’s even more important when spending a long day at the historic sights in Sintra. There are hundreds of steps, uneven paths and steep inclines where it could be easy to twist an ankle or take a fall.

Patience

Patience may be the most important thing you will need for your day trip to Sintra! Crowds are inevitable. We encountered lines to exit the train station, lines to board the bus and lines to buy tickets…and we visited in the wintertime on a weekday. We are sure the lines are only longer in the high-season. It’s best to take a deep breath, relax and enjoy it.

 

How To Get To Sintra from Lisbon

Getting to Sintra from Lisbon is easy! Simply hop on the direct Lisbon-Sintra train at the Rossio Train Station in Lisbon city center and depart at the final stop, Sintra Station. The train to Sintra (sometimes called the Rossio-Sintra Train for the stations at each end of the line) is a commuter train used by both locals going to work and tourists going on day trips from Lisbon by train.

A second train line originating at the Oriente Station also terminates at Sintra Train Station. The Oriente-Sintra line is likely not as convenient for most Lisbon tourists, but it’s best to check both routes for the closest station to your accommodations.

During the weekdays, there are multiple departures every hour, but fewer trains run on weekends. On Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays, there is only one train per hour on the Rossio-Sintra Line – and two per hour on the Oriente-Sintra Line. Current Lisbon to Sintra train times can be found online at the official Comboios de Portugal (CP) website and in this PDF of the Lisbon to Sintra Train Schedule (current 2019).  

Sintra to Lisbon Train

Catching the Sintra to Lisbon train for your ride back to the city is just as easy as the train ride to Sintra – but we do have a couple of tips! At the Sintra Railway Station, check the board to ensure you board the correct Lisbon-bound train. If you want to end in the Lisbon city center, board the Rossio train. Trains run late into the night, with the last train from Sintra to Lisbon departing after midnight at 12:20am.

 

What is the Lisbon to Sintra Train Cost?

Train fares are calculated by the number of zones the train crosses. Passengers traveling from Rossio or Oriente to Sintra will cross 4 zones. Single tickets purchased from the machine or at the counter cost €2.25 (one way). If the train from Lisbon to Sintra is the only public transport you will be using in on your trip to Lisbon, then single tickets are the best option. However, they can only be purchased at the time of travel (no advance sales). 

Fares can also be paid by using the Viva Viagem Transport Card – and the ride costs less if you use the ‘Zapping’ fare. Rather than €2.25, the ride is only €1.90. The cost of the Viagem card is €.50. Card holders need to pre-load the card with currency (in increments of €3, 5, 10, 15, 25) and each traveler needs their own card. When using the card, make sure to ‘Tap On’ before boarding the train. You will also be required to ‘Tap Out’ to exit the train station in Sintra.

The benefit of the card is that is can also be used for discounted fares on other methods of Lisbon transport. For example, paying cash for the tram costs €3, but with the card it is only €1.35. The card can also be used to ride the ferry if visiting Cristo Rei. Find a complete fare explanation here

Top Tip: Buy – and top up – a pre-paid Viagem Card the day before you travel to Sintra to avoid long lines (and possibly missing your desired train) on the morning of your trip.

 

FAQs for How To Go To Sintra from Lisbon

Frequently asked questions – and answers – for the train to Sintra from Lisbon.

How Far is Sintra from Lisbon?

The distance from Lisbon to Sintra is about 30km (18 miles). It takes 40 minutes for the train to travel from Rossio Station to Sintra. The Oriente-Sintra train takes about 10 minutes longer.

Can I Buy a Reserved Train Seat Online?

Tickets cannot be purchased online and there is no reserved seating.

Is There a Bus from Lisbon to Sintra?

Getting from Lisbon to Sintra, Portugal is possible by bus, but the route takes longer and costs about the same price. The best way to get to Sintra from Lisbon is by train.


 

Sintra Tickets

Tickets are required to enter most of the sights on our Sintra itinerary. Although they are not individually expensive, the prices do add up. Some tickets can be purchased together for a small reduction in price. Note: Sintra prices are valid as of 2019; check current prices here.

 

Pena Palace + Park Tickets

Adult (18-64): €14 | Youth (6-17): €12.50  |  Seniors (65+): €12.50  |  Family (2 Adult + 2 Youth): €49

 

Pena Park Only Tickets

Adult (18-64): €7.50 | Youth (6-17): €6.50  |  Seniors (65+): €6.5  |  Family (2 Adult + 2 Youth): €26

 

Moorish Sintra Castle Tickets

Adult (18-64): €8 | Youth (6-17): €6.50  |  Seniors (65+): €6.50  |  Family (2 Adult + 2 Youth): €26

 

National Sintra Palace Tickets

Adult (18-64): €10 | Youth (6-17): €8.50  |  Seniors (65+): €8.50  |  Family (2 Adult + 2 Youth): €33

 

Quinta da Regaleira Estate

Adult (18-64): €8 | Youth (6-17): €5  |  Seniors (65-79): €5  |  Senior+ (80+): Free

 

Sintra Combined Ticket

Guests can purchase a discounted, combination ticket for the official Parques de Sintra Monte da Lua sights. The sights eligible for the Sintro combo ticket on our itinerary are: The Pena Palace (plus park), Moorish Castle and National Palace of Sintra. Visitors who buy all three tickets at the same time will get a 6% discount off the total price. If purchasing two sights on the Sintra Combination Ticket, a 5% discount will be applied. The Regaleira Estate is not included in the Sintra combination ticket.

 

Sintra Tickets Online

Tickets for the Parques de Sintra Monte da Lua sights can be purchased online in advance on the official park website. This can save time and hassle on the day of your trip. 

 

Lisbon Day Pass

The Lisbon Card entitles card holders to discounted admission to some of the things to do in Sintra. The card offers a 10% discount for the Pena Palace; a 10% discount for the National Palace of Sintra; and a 20% discount for the Regaleira Estate. The Lisbon Card also provides discounts on some organized Lisbon-Sintra Tours. Find out more information about the Lisbon Card here


 

Getting Around Sintra: Walk or Sintra Bus?

There are multiple ways to get around Sintra, including buses, taxis, mini cars and tuk tuks. When we were determining the best (as in, easiest and cheapest) methods of getting around Sintra, we compared the benefits of the Sintra Hop On Hop Off Bus, the Sintra Bus Line 434 and using our own two feet.

 

Sintra Walking Trails

The top Sintra things to do are linked together by intertwining trails through forested nature parks. The paths allow visitors to easily create their own Sintra walking tour from sight-to-sight. Not only is it free to walk on the paths between the sights, but it’s also less chaotic and requires zero time standing in lines.

That said, the region is covered in hills – and the uphill walk can be strenuous. Relatively fit people with good walking shoes shouldn’t have any issue, but rainy season can make the dirt paths muddy and summer heat can make for a hot trek. Get a map of the Pedestrian Path and Vila Sassetti from the tourist office and find other Sintra hiking trails here

 

Sintra Bus 434

The 434 Sintra Bus is an economical and fairly straight-forward way to get to the sights in Sintra without walking. The Sintra tourist bus route, Circuito da Pena, departs from the train station (Sintra Estacao) and makes three stops before looping back to the station. The route includes stops at the Moorish Castle and Pena Palace. Passengers can choose a one-way ticket (€3.90) or a Loop Ticket, which allows passengers to disembark and re-board at each stop, but only in order (€6.90).

The bus departs frequently at regular intervals, however, there will almost certainly be a line (so remember your patience!). If buying a one-way or Loop ticket, fares are purchased from the driver. It is useful to have exact change. The bus stop for Route 434 is located right outside the train station (to the right).

Another Sintra Bus, Route 435, makes stops at four palaces: Sintra National Palace, Regaleira Palace, Seteais Palace and Monserrate Palace. The hop-on-hop-off ticket price for Bus 435 is €5. This route is economical and an easy way to travel to the palaces, but only if you plan on going to Seteais and Monserrate (which we did not include in our one-day Sintra itinerary). While the route does make a stop at Regaleira (which is included in our one-day Sintra tour), the estate is only a short walk from the city center and can easily be reached on foot.

The bus company, Scotturb, also sells a daily tourist ticket (€15) that is good on all of their routes. However, we can’t imagine how a first-time, day-trip visitor from Lisbon could get adequate use out of it, unless skipping the main sights for the lesser-visited ones. (We talk about more Sintra attractions at the end of the post.)

 

Hop On Hop Off Sintra

The red Sintra sightseeing bus runs two convenient routes for sightseeing in Sintra. Perks of the bus include open-air upper deck, free on-board wifi and pre-recorded commentary about the sights. Visitors can choose where and when to hop on and off. However, it’s a bit expensive at €20. Visitors with mobility issues and those who are only interested in exploring 1 or 2 sights, but are eager to see the area may find value in the official Sintra Hop On Hop Off Bus.

 

The Best Way To See Sintra

We think the best way to see Sintra is a combination of bus and walking. We recommend buying the one-way ticket on Route 434 at the bus/train station. Save time and energy by riding uphill to Pena Palace – and then walk between the sights the rest of the day. With that said, budget travelers, early-starters and nature lovers can easily bypass the bus and just hike up the path.

Do not use the road to walk to the Moorish Castle and Pena Palace! Although Google Maps does not show the hiking trail, you can use this link to Google Maps for the route from the station to the pedestrian path that leads to the castle and palace.

 

About Exploring Sintra Sights

It is important to note that taking the bus – or any other method of vehicular transport – will not completely eliminate the need to walk in Sintra. After entering sights, like the Palace of Pena and the Moorish Castle, there is a long walk to actually get to the entrance gate. Additionally, the parks at both the Pena Palace and the Regaleira Estate are part of the attraction (and shouldn’t be missed!). Even if you plan on using a bus to get between sights, be prepared to walk once at the sights.


 

A Day In Sintra Itinerary: The Perfect Plan

Our trip to Sintra includes a full day of exploration – and a step-by-step plan to get the most out of the day. We have included information about each sight and how we traveled from sight-to-sight, as well as a link to all the sights on Google Maps. At the end of the post, you will find a Sintra map of attractions.

 

The Day Prior to Your Sintra Day Trip

The day before you set off on a day trip to Sintra, get prepared. Buy food for a picnic lunch and other snacks, pack items you will need during the day in your day pack and top up (or buy) your Viva Viagem Transport Card. You will need at least €3.80 credit on the card (plus more if using other public transport to get to your departure station). Stop at the Tourist Information Office to get pamphlets for your trip (these are also available at ticket offices in Sintra if you don’t have time to pick one up in advance). Buy your Sintra tickets to attractions online so that you won’t have to wait in long lines when you arrive. Finally, read up on the history of Sintra on wiki for a better understanding of the region. 

 

Hop Aboard a Lisbon to Sintra Train

In order to make the most of the day, visitors need to be on one of the early trains from Lisbon. Aim to be on the 8:11am weekday train from Rossio Train Station to Sintra (or the 8:01am weekend/holiday train). If you are taking public transport to get to Rossio (or any other station), give yourself plenty of time for connections. Buses and trains don’t always run on time – and a late arrival by bus could result in missing your Rossio to Sintra train. Rossio Train Station Map.

Top Tip: If you do miss the first train, don’t fret! Just get on the next one and keep an eye on the time throughout the day.

 

Arrive in Sintra, Portugal

When you arrive at the Sintra railway station, you will need your Viagem Card to tap out, so keep it handy. There will likely be lines to exit the station, as there are limited exit points. There is a toilet inside the station, which costs €.50 to use. Exit the station though the main building and find the 434 Bus Stop (to the right). Purchase a one-way ticket from the driver and ride to Pena Palace. Sintra Train Station Map.

Top Tip: Sights open at 9:30am (10:00am in the winter). The first Sintra Bus 434 leaves the station at 9:15am. All sights have free toilets, but not all have potable water.

 

Sight #1: Pena Palace (Palacio Nacional da Pena)

Allow 2-3 hours. Visitors can buy Sintra Penta Palace Tickets that include both the palace and the park – or Pena Park Only tickets, for half the price. Pena Palace Map.

The colorful, hill-topping Palace of Pena is the highlight of Sintra – and not to be missed! We did, however, skip the interior and opted for the Pena Park Only ticket. The Park Ticket allows for up-close views of the palace and access to balconies, just not entrance into the interior.

The Neo-Romantic palace incorporates parts of a previous chapel (Our Lady of Pena) and monastery that survived the 1755 Great Lisbon Earthquake. In the mid-1800s, King Consort Ferdinand II converted the ruins into a royal summer residence. It was built in the Romantic style – but other elements, such as Medieval, Gothic, Manueline, Renaissance and Islamic touches, can be found throughout.  

Visitors – even Park Only ticket holders – can walk up the ramp and explore the incredible details of the exterior of the castle. Key points of interest include the Coat of Arms (above the second archway leading up to the castle), the main facade geometric tiles, the intricate Triton (Half-Man Half-Fish) creature above the entrance to the west-facing balcony and the Wall Walk.

 

Pena Palace Park

The expansive Palace of Pena Park encompasses more than 200 acres of land around the palace. The planned park features statues, ponds and viewpoints. Trees and plants from around the world decorate the garden – and a network of trails weave through the park. Take a leisurely stroll through the park, but make sure to find Saint Catherine’s Heights, which offers stunning castle views.

Work your way downhill to the Valley of Lakes and exit via the Lakes Entrance – then walk (slightly uphill) to the Moorish Castle.

 

Sight #2: Moorish Castle (Castelo dos Mouros)

Allow 1-2 hours. Castle of the Moors Tickets allow access to all parts of the castle grounds. Moorish Castle Map.

Strategically located for defense purposes, the imposing Moorish Castle was constructed from the 8th to 10th centuries. Built by the Berbers (Moors) who controlled the territory at the time, the castle has been expanded and altered throughout history. From the 12th century to the 15th century, the castle featured a chapel and was used more for religious functions than as a military fort. In 1840, King Consort Ferdinand II renovated the castle and, soon after, archaeological investigation began.

Inside the castle, visitors are free to explore the grounds, towers and walls. The Castle Keep provides incredible views of the Old Town and out to sea, while the Royal Tower overlooks the Palace of Pena. Spend time taking in the panoramic views, visiting the Cistern and learning about the history of the castle. Take note of the different flags flying from the towers; each represents a different ruler.  

When you depart the castle, rather than exiting through the archway to the main street, detour to the right onto the Pedestrian Path.

 

Pedestrian Path

Allow a half hour. There is no fee or ticket required to walk on the path. The Pedestrian Path is not recognized on Google Maps; the trailhead is on the right through an arch just before exiting the Moorish Castle to the street. 

The nature trail, which initially runs parallel to the road, leads to a simple viewing platform. Stop and take in the grandeur of the magnificent Moorish Castle before heading down the stairs and continuing through the forest. The path winds around the base of the Penedo da Amizade – a towering 150-foot sheer cliff face, which is used for recreational rock climbing. The route passes through two doorways and then begins a decent of switchbacks through gardens.

Follow the serpentine path down to Vila Sassetti.

 

Sight #3: Vila Sassetti

Allow 15 minutes. There is no fee or ticket required to visit the grounds of Vila Sassetti. Vila Sassetti Map.

Built in the 1890s, Vila Sassetti was designed as the summer residence of Victor Carlos Sassetti, a wealthy hotel owner. After Sassetti’s death, the home passed through several hands – and both the compound and garden were expanded. Inspired by castles in Northern Italy, the residence features a turret and terracotta decoration. Antique 17th century tiles are found on the outer wall near a door.

Continue walking down the sloping path to Estrada da Pena street. Go right to the intersection and then turn left on R. Mal. Saldanha. Walk along the side of the road; you will pass the Cascata de Pisoes waterfall and the Regaleira Estate exit. Continue following the road around the corner to the left and uphill to the Quinta da Regaleira entrance. The walk will take about 20 minutes.

 

Sight #4: Quinta da Regaleira Estate

Allow 2-3 hours. Tickets and audio guides are purchased just inside the main gate. Regaleira Estate Map

The Regaleira Estate is named for the Viscountess of Regaleira, the original owner of the property, but it was Caralho Monteiro who transformed the land into the fairytale estate it is today. Constructed between 1904 and 1910, the extraordinary complex includes an intricately decorated palace and chapel (both of which can be visited), as well as a hillside garden that is fraught with extravagant features.

In addition to the fountains, ponds and towers, the land is riddled with a network of tunnels (which are open to be explored – just bring a flashlight!). The most intriguing sights at Quinta da Regaleira are the Initiation Wells – or Inverted Towers. Never used as water wells, stairs spiral down to the bottom and provide access to underground tunnels.

After exploring the grounds of the Regaleira Estate, retrace your steps toward town. At the fork in the road, bear left onto R. Consiglieri Pedroso and follow it to the National Palace of Sintra. Map Route. 

 

Sight #5: Palace of Sintra (Palacio de Sintra) and Old Town

Allow 1 hour; more time (another half hour) if visiting the National Palace interior. Tickets are required to enter. Palace of Sintra Map

Easily recognizable by the double cone chimneys, the historic Palace of Sintra was established sometime before the 10th century under Islamic Moorish rule. Destroyed, expanded and embellished over the years, the Palace of Sintra was used as a Portuguese royal residence from the15th to 19th centuries. The iconic palace is located in the heart of the Sintra old town. Stand on the main entrance steps for a view of the town, which crawls up the hill toward the Moorish Castle.

Note: We skipped visiting the interior of the National Palace of Sintra based on fellow traveler’s reviews. During the time of our visit in the winter, we learned that many of the rooms were vacant or closed and all of the rooms lacked informational plaques.

 

Casa Piriquita

Founded in 1862, the famous Casa Piriquita churns out delectable sweets that are legendary in Sintra. The shop is just across the street from the palace (map). The original owners and bakers were well-known for their Queijadas – a small confection made using requeijao cheese, eggs, milk and sugar. In the 1940s, the founder’s granddaughter created a new pastry, the Travesseiro. Often referred to as the Sintra Pillow Pastry, the recipe for the rectangular, cream-filled pastry is kept secret.

Top Tip: Buy one of each and enjoy them on the palace steps.

 

Sintra Old Town

Before heading directly to the station for the train to Lisbon, stroll through the Sintra Old Town and admire the architecture. Our favorite building is the Camara Municipal de Sintra – the City Hall – which has several unique features, including an ornate clock tower and tiled roof (map).

 

Sintra Train Station

Make your way back to the Sintra railway station for the next train to Lisbon. Make sure to get on the Rossio Station train if you are heading into the Lisbon city center.

 

Sintra Tourist Map

Before you travel from Lisbon to Sintra, we highly recommend that you get a map of Sintra places to visit. However, you can use this map to locate the top sights! 

 

 

Cost of our Sintra Day Trip

As budget-conscious travelers, we calculated the cost of our day trip to Sintra. Here is what we spent – from the train tickets to the sights. Note: We already had the Viagem Card.

Transportation

  • Lisbon to Sintra Train: €1.90
  • Sintra Bus 434 One-Way: €3.90
  • Sintra to Lisbon Train: €1.90

Sights

  • Pena Palace Park Only: €7.50
  • Moorish Castle: €8
  • Regaleira Estate: €8
  • Piriquita Pastries: €2.30

Total Spent on Sintra Day Trip = €33.50 per person (which is about $38 USD).

 


 

More Tips of What To Do in Sintra, Portugal

Our itinerary outlines what to see in Sintra in one day. It is ideal for first-time visitors who want to see the highlights of the city. However, there is much more to see in the region. Guests with a car, those staying in Sintra or anyone who wants to make multiple trips to Sintra might want to add these attractions to their Sintra sightseeing itinerary.

Monserrate Palace

Founded on the site of an ancient chapel, Monserrate Palace was built in 1863, using Romanticism, Moorish Revival and Neo-Gothic elements. The property is surrounded by a large park that features grottos, ponds and exotic plants.

Seteais Palace

The national landmark Seteais Palace was built in the late 1700s and expanded in the early 1800s. The neoclassical structure houses a luxury hotel and the restaurant offers a decadent Portuguese Afternoon Tea.

Natural History Museum

The Sintra Natural History Museum opened in 2009. The artifacts on display belonged to the private collection of Miguel Barbosa. Top attractions include fossils and a Big Bang simulation.

Sintra to Cabo da Roca

Cape Roca is the westernmost point of Portugal – and can be reached from Sintra by car or bus. Steep cliffs and weather-shaped rocks line the coast and beach.

Sintra to Cascais

Seaside Cascais is an inviting tourist town famous for its beaches and coastline. Long a summertime escape for the wealthy, Cascais exudes a posh ambiance.

 

3 Days in Lisbon, Portugal A Detailed Lisbon Itinerary by JetSettingFools.com

3 Days in Lisbon, Portugal: A Detailed Lisbon Itinerary

 

Organized Lisbon Day Tours

While Sintra is the most popular of all the Lisbon excursions, there are other places to visit that can be visited in a day. Many of the organized day tours from Lisbon visit multiple places. For example, there are day trips from Lisbon, Portugal that visit both Sintra and Cascais in one day.

Sintra-Cascais Tour

Lisbon visitors who want to see both Sintra and Cascais can join one of the many tours that makes stops in both destinations. A day trip from Lisbon to Sintra and Cascais typically visits the Pena Palace, Roca Cape and Cascais Beach. Read the ReviewsTop Tip: While it is possible for visitors to create their own DIY tour to Sintra and Cascais, we don’t recommend it without a car. 

Sintra Half Day Tour

Visitors can embark on one of the half-day Sintra private tours that allows guests to completely customize the tour. Choose which sights you want to see within a 4-hour timeframe on this Sintra guided tour. Find out more!

Sintra, Cascais, Belem and Lisbon City Tour

Join a guide for a full-day private tour of the best of Lisbon and the surrounding area! Guests begin by exploring Sintra, then travel along the coastline to Cascais and Estoril before arriving at Belem to see the sights. End the day discovering Lisbon’s Alfama district. Get the details

 


 

We Want To Know: What would you add to our Sintra travel guide? Do you have any tips for a day trip to Sintra? Give us your best advice in the comments below!

 

Start planning your trip to Portugal! Search for the lowest airfares, the best accommodations and fun things to do…then start packing!  Want more travel planning tips? Head over to our Travel Planning page for more information and tips on traveling – and for country-specific information, take a look at our Travel Guides page!

 

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Day Trip To Sintra Tour by JetSettingFools.com

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