Porto Food: What and Where To Eat in Porto, Portugal by JetSettingFools.com

Porto Food: What and Where To Eat in Porto, Portugal

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Eating Porto food is a highlight of any trip to Portugal! From meaty sandwiches to hearty casseroles to sweet treats, there is a long list of must-try Porto dishes. During our stay, we ventured into the best restaurants in Porto in search of the most delectable local cuisine. We are sharing our top tips for what and where to eat in Porto, Portugal to help fellow travelers in their quest to find the best fare in the city.

 

Traditional Portuguese Food

To be honest, it took us awhile to warm up to Portuguese food. Some of the translations – hot dogs, cod balls, nail in bread and kale soup – just didn’t sound very appetizing. However, once we got a taste of the food in Porto, we were hooked.

Porto typical food is often classified as heavy comfort food. Delicious casseroles and stews are made from potatoes, cod and sausages. Sandwiches piled with meat and cheese are combined in a variety of unique ways to create the best cheap eats in Porto. Of course, not all traditional food in Portugal is savory – the country is well-known for its delectable egg custard desserts, too.

Although the best food in Porto, Portugal is – no doubt – laden with calories, there are plenty of hills to work it all off. There is no excuse not to indulge! 

Pro Tip: Use our Self-Guided Porto Walking Tour to route your way to the top city sights! Coming soon! 

 

Where To Eat in Porto, Portugal

In our search for the best food in Porto, we also sought out the best places to eat in Porto. Therefore, our list of What To Eat in Porto includes specific dishes – as well as a recommended restaurant to eat them at.

As we were mostly interested in sampling Porto food specialties that Portuguese people actually eat, we veered away from touristic restaurants and aimed to find spots with a mix of locals and visitors.

 

Best Restaurants: Porto

We think the best Porto restaurants are ones where tourists can dine side-by-side with locals. The places we include on our list are typical establishments – and most are far from fancy. That said, they are not without character and a big dose of charm.

Porto Restaurant Tips

For foreigners, dining habits and table service can appear to be quite different in Portugal. Some things to be aware of when eating in Porto is that there are often lines (either to order or for seats), English menu translations can be difficult to understand, meals are brought to the table when each dish is ready and checks are not always delivered to the table (diners just get up and walk to the register to pay).

Service is usually delivered with a smile, but waitstaff tend to leave you on your own until you call them to your table. Many of our recommended Porto food dishes can take time to prepare, but – trust us – it’s worth the wait! 


 

Porto Food

For all of our recommended things to eat in Porto, we include a description of the dish, as well as a recommended restaurant. For each Porto restaurant, we include a link to Google Maps, so that fellow travelers can easily locate it. At the end of the post, we include a map of all our recommended Porto Restaurants.

Visitors can use our guide to create their own self-guided Porto food tours – and we include a few top-rated guided tours at the end of the post as well.

Our Porto Food Guide contains everything you need to know about Porto, Portugal food! Save, Pin or Bookmark this blog post so that you can easily access it on your trip!

 

Cachorrinhos

We didn’t think we would kick off our list of “Best Food Porto” with a hot dog…yet here we are. To be honest, at first, we were skeptical of the iconic Porto fast food hot dog – but let us assure you: it is a must-try! A Cachorrinhos hot dog is utterly simple, yet truly tasty.

The sausage is grilled to sizzling perfection then it’s popped inside crusty bread and covered with cheese. After being pressed on the grill, the sandwich is cut into bite-sized pieces and topped with a spicy sauce. That is all there is to it…but it is amazing!

Where To Eat Cachorrinhos: Gazela Cachorrinhos da Batalha

MAP. Far and away the most popular place for Porto hot dogs is the famous Gazel Cachorrinhos da Batalha. The eatery attracts patrons from all walks of life…and everyone comes for the hot dogs. At the diner-style restaurant, people are greeted with a handshake and a smile – just like a regular at a corner bar.

Diners belly up to the counter and watch the busy crew crank out piping hot cachorrinhos and plates of salty fries. We recommend getting at least two hot dogs – they are just that good! – and a plate of fries to make it a meal. 

Pro Tip: There are now two locations, but we recommend going to the original diner…even if the line is out the door!

 

Francesinha Porto Sandwich

For many people Porto Food is the Francesinha. A staple of Porto cuisine and listed on nearly every cafe and restaurant menu in the city, the Francesinha is the mother of all sandwiches. The name translates to ‘Little Frenchie’ and is somewhat similar to a Croque Madame – only thicker and messier.

While each chef has their own unique variations of the sandwich, standard ingredients include bread, cured ham, smoked sausage, fresh sausage, steak, cheese and a specialty sauce. The sandwich is layered with the meat and cheese and then grilled. As a final preparation, cheese is melted over the top of the sandwich (and usually an egg as well!) then drowned in a tomato and beer sauce.

The first time we tried this sandwich was in Lisbon – which was a huge mistake; the Francesinha is a Porto specialty food and, as such, the best Francesinhas are made in Porto.

Where To Eat Francesinha: O Afonso Porto Restaurant

MAP. O Afonso is ranked as one of the Porto best restaurants for a Francesinha – and it does not disappoint! From the welcoming waitstaff to traditional snacks to the main dish as well as the complimentary post-meal port wine, we were impressed every step of the way. The place is so well-known for their version of the sandwich that even the late Anthony Bourdain dined at O Afonso.

The well-pressed, stacked Francesinha held its form and was complimented by the sauce – and the fries (served on a separate platter) were the perfect accompaniment. Some people say that the Francesinha is big enough for two people…but we had no problem each devouring our own!

Pro Tip: Cafe Santiago is another Porto institution that excels at making a fabulous Francesinha sandwich. While we thought it was certainly a tasty and decadent meal, no Francesinha is made the same…and we give the nod to the sandwiches at O Afonso. 

 

Bacalhau com Natas

Rich and delicious, Bacalhau com Natas, Porto, Portugal

Dried and salted cod – called Bacalhau in Portuguese – is a very traditional food in Porto; in fact, it is the national dish of Portugal. The local joke is that there are 365 ways to make Bacalhau, one for each day of the year.

Initially, we were turned off by Bacalhau. The dried fish is stacked in the grocery stores and omits a pungent fishy aroma. We couldn’t imagine how they made it taste good…but we were finally proven wrong when we ate our first bite.

For a taste of the Porto traditional food, there is nothing better than Bacalhau com Natas – or Cod with Cream. The creamy cod casserole is layered with bacalhau, onion, fried potatoes and cream. The oven-baked dish is spiced with nutmeg and white pepper…yes, it’s rich and absolutely divine!

Another popular Salted Cod dish that I love is Bacalhau a Bras. It is very popular in Lisbon, but appears on menus in Porto, too. This Portuguese dish features cod, potatoes, eggs, onions, parsley and garlic – and is more like a scramble than a casserole.

Where To Eat Bacalhau com Natas: Bacalhau do Porto at Mercado Beira-Rio

MAP. The best Bacalhau com Natas we ate was at the namesake Bacalhau do Porto at the Mercado Beira-Rio along the waterfront in Vila Nova de Gaia. The casserole was almost velvety and full of flavor…just be careful of the fish bones!

Pro Tip: We talk more about the food markets in Porto in a minute!

 

Porto Bifana

Considered a Portuguese snack, the Bifana sandwich is a common fast food in Porto that can serve as a quick meal or late-night grub. The sandwich – which consists of only seasoned pork on bread – is incredibly simple, yet it tantalizes the taste buds.

The best bifanas are piled with meat that has been simmered in a pot along with spicy seasonings that soak into the bread roll. Although I’m usually not a fan of soggy bread, it worked magically in a Bifana. So much so that I wanted a second one!

Where To Eat The Best Bifana: Conga

MAP. Conga is, hands down, the best-known place to eat Bifanas. In operation since 1976, Conga takes pride in simmering their pork to perfection. Bifana em Pao Sandwiches are assembled over the steaming pot of pork; bread is stuffed with a heaping portion of meat and then partially dipped into the sauce for good measure.  

Arriving just ahead of the lunch crowd will ensure you get a seat – either at the counter or in the upstairs restaurant. We got to Conga at about 12:30pm and breezed right in, but by the time we left, every table was filled and there was a long queue at the door. 

Pro Tip: While I loved the Bifanas at Conga, Kris actually preferred the ones he ate at Taxca, a Petiscos restaurant that we talk more about in a minute!

 

Pernil Com Queijo Sandwich

All pork sandwiches are not equal…and, in Porto, the Pernil com Queijo is proof of that. Similar to a Bifana, the Pernil com Queijo is a basic pork sandwich. What makes the Pernil com Queijo different is that it is made with roasted pork shoulder and covered in the famous regional Serra da Estrela cheese. The contents are stuffed inside a rustic roll that is crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. The aromatic (some say ‘stinky’) cheese melts into the tender pork, ensuring every single bite is supreme.

Where To Eat Pernil com Queijo: Casa Guedes

MAP. There is no better place in the city to get a Pernil com Queijo than Casa Guedes. Ideal for a quick lunch or to satisfy a late-night craving, at Casa Guedes they excel at the Pernil com Queijo. We loved the sandwich so much that Casa Guedes quickly became one of our favorite Porto restaurants.  There is often a line, but it moves fast. We recommend ordering the sandwich with fries and either a Super Bock light beer or white wine.

Pro Tip: Casa Guedes is so popular that they recently opened a second 3-story restaurant just a few doors down. The much larger (and sleeker) restaurant has an expanded menu and a rooftop terrace…but we still like getting our sandwiches from the original corner spot.

 

Prego no Pao Sandwich

Must eat in Porto, Prego no Pao Sandwich, Mais 5. Porto, Portugal

The Prego no Pao is Portuguese cuisine that we almost skipped – simply because we couldn’t figure out what it was. The name translates to Nail in Bread, which – let’s face it – doesn’t sound appetizing at all.

The unfortunate translation is a huge injustice, because the Prego no Pao sandwich is actually heavenly. Like many other Porto sandwiches, it is quite simple: a Prego no Pao is a marinaded, garlicky, cheesy, tender steak sandwich.

The name ‘Nail in Bread’ comes from the art of using a mallet to tenderize the steak and pound the pieces of garlic into the meat before grilling it. The result is a melt-in-your-mouth sandwich. 

Where To Eat Prego em Pao: Venham Mais 5

MAP. Prego sandwiches are found on many Porto restaurant menus. We ate (more like devoured) ours at Venham Mais 5: Casa dos Pregos, where they specialize in the art of the Prego. 

At Venham Mais 5 – a name that translates clearly to ‘Bring Five More’ – they make incredibly tender Prego no Pao sandwiches that are covered in gooey Serra da Estrela cheese. The space is homely and service is quick. 

Had we not ordered fries and Alheira (more on what that is in a minute!), we definitely would have ordered a few more! 

Pro Tip: If you order more than one sandwich, just be sure to leave room for a slice of their famous – and oh-so-decadent – chocolate cake! The sweet treat balances out the savory feast! 

 

Rotisserie Chicken Porto Style (with Piri Piri Sauce)

Grilling meat over hot coals is a specialty in Porto – as evidenced by the number of churrascarias (barbecues) found around the city. The scent of grilled chicken often floats out of restaurant doors, luring in hungry patrons.

While the rotisserie chicken alone is delicious, many vendors use the local Piri Piri sauce to add a little spice to the meal. Piri Piri sauce – a combination of chilis, citrus, onion, garlic, pepper and other spices – was created by Portuguese settlers in Mozambique in the 15th century – and it is now a staple condiment in Portuguese cuisine.

Where To Eat Piri Piri Chicken in Porto: Pedro dos Frangos Churrascaria

MAP. Pedro dos Frangos is consistently ranked as one of the best restaurants in Porto, Portugal for rotisserie chicken…as evidenced by the line out the door. In fact, the restaurant is so popular (with both locals and tourists) that they opened a second location across the street. In both restaurants, they grill whole chickens on a spit right at the entrance.

The portions are enormous – and the well-dressed, mild-mannered waiters are helpful in making sure patrons don’t over-order. The rotisserie chicken is served with fries – and guests can ask for Piri Piri sauce on the side.

Pro Tip: While chicken (frango in Portuguese) is the star at Pedro dos Frangos, they offer a full menu of typical Portuguese food at their restaurant. We highly recommend trying the Octopus Salad (Salada de Polvo) as a starter!

 

Alheira

Porkless Sausage, Venham Mais 5, Porto, Portugal

Alheira is a porkless sausage – usually consisting of fowl or game meat and bread. It was created in the late 15th century when Jews were forced to convert to Christianity of face expulsion from the country.

Many Jews were baptized as Christians in order to stay in Portugal, but secretly practiced Judaism. As Jews do not eat pork, they created Alheira – a non-pork sausage – which they could freely eat and appear as if they no longer followed Jewish laws.

The cuisine remains popular today – and Alheira is now a common Portuguese food. 

Where to Eat Alheira in Porto

The poultry sausage is commonly found on menus around the city – and is a popular Petiscos item, too. We ate Alheira at several Porto restaurants – but our favorite was at Venham Mais 5. 

Pro Tip: Because of the softer poultry meat and bread, Alheira can be a bit mushy in consistency…but the flavor is great! 

 

Petiscos (Small Plates)

Often referred to as tapas, Portuguese Petiscos are part of the unique food culture in the country. Unlike bite-size tapas, Petiscos are small plates of traditional Porto food that are often shared as a snack while drinking. Served in both taverns and restaurants alongside beer or wine, Petiscos provide a leisurely way to dine with friends or family.

Common Petiscos dishes include Salads de Polvo (Octopus Salad), Pipis/Moelas (Chicken Gizzards), Bifanas, Bolinhos de Bacalhau (cod balls), Presunto (cured Iberian ham) and Pica Pau (which translates to Woodpecker, but refers to bite-sized marinated meats and pickled veg that are eaten with toothpicks).

That said, Petiscos can be as simple as a basket of bread, a bowl of olives or Conservas (Portugal’s famous tinned fish). One of our favorite Petiscos is Chourico Assado – a flaming sausage cooked table-side in a terracotta dish.

Visitors should have no problem finding places where to eat Petiscos in Porto. There are dedicated Petiscos restaurants all over the city – and almost all taverns and cafes offer the snack plates, too. 

The Best Petiscos Restaurants Porto, Portugal: Taxca

We think the best place to eat Porto-style tapas is at Taxca. The restaurant specializes in petiscos meals, offering an array of options and a rotating menu of goods. We feasted on plates of bifanas (these were Kris’ favorite!), codfish cakes, ham-and-cheese sandwiches and Alheira sausages – but they also make daily stews, salads and casseroles.

Visitors can order one plate at a time or order several items at once. Although much more spacious than most taverns in the city, in typical fashion, diners place orders at the bar. 

Pro Tip: For an upscale petiscos experience complimented with craft cocktails or delicious local wine, go to Drogaria Bar (MAP). The cozy ambiance is superb – as are the food and drink! Or, for a casual, riverside meal of Petiscos, try Gourmet da Emilia, which is located outside the Mercado Beira Rio (where they also have inexpensive Port wine tastings). 

 

Caldo Verde Soup

Caldo Verde Soup, Porto, Portugal

Portuguese Green Soup – or Caldo Verde – is a simple concoction of leafy greens (such as Kale or Cabbage), potatoes and olive oil. The soup is sometimes spiced with onion or garlic and a slice of sausage can be added right before serving.

Caldo Verde originated in northern Portugal and is usually eaten at celebrations – such as weddings and holidays. However, the satisfying dish is found on most menus and is one of the best cheap eats in Porto that is somewhat healthy.

Where To Eat Porto Caldo Verde

We tried Caldo Verde as an accompaniment to numerous meals around the city…and don’t have one that stands out as a favorite. (Kris actually doesn’t like it at all.) In some places, like Conga, the broth was thin, while at Pedro dos Frangos, it was thick and packed with kale.

 

Snacks and Street Food Porto

Porto street food can be sweet or savory – but it is always inexpensive. Bakeries are the best places to eat when it comes to on-the-go snacks and street food. On countless occasions, the treats piled high in the bakery windows persuaded us to take a break from sightseeing for a quick bite. Likewise, at many of the city taverns, it is difficult not to indulge in the snacks perched behind the bar. 

Cheap Eats Porto

While there is a seemingly endless list of pastries and fried morsels to eat in Porto, we are highlighting a few of our favorites.

Pasteis de Bacalhau (Codfish Cakes)

Bacalhau is so ingrained in the Porto food scene that some version of the salted cod can be found almost everywhere…even in pastry shops. Savory codfish cakes take on a variety of forms – including cod balls, salt cod fritters and cod croquettes. Bolinhos de Bacalhau – cod balls – are perhaps the most common cod snack. Made with potatoes, codfish, eggs, parsley, onion and sometimes spices, the batter is formed into balls and deep fried.

 

Rissoles (Portuguese Meat Pie)

The Portuguese version of dumplings or pierogies, Rissoles are deep-fried, half-moon pastries filled with meat or shrimp. Pastel de Chaves is another meat pastry that originated in the town of Chaves in northern Portugal in 1862 and is commonly found in taverns. The flaky pastry is filled with minced veal, bread and onions.

 

Broa de Avintes Portuguese Bread

One of the best things to eat in Porto (and nearly everywhere in Europe, in our opinion!) is fresh bread. There is a great variety of Portuguese bread – which is sold in Porto bakeries and offered at restaurants (often for an extra fee, even though it is brought to the table…so ask the waiter before eating if you don’t want to incur an extra charge).

One bread to try in Porto is Broa de Avintes. Created in the nearby town of Avintes, the dense bread is made of corn and rye and has a strong, spicy taste. Pao de Centeio – another northern Portugal bread – is similar to Broa de Avintes and is just as filling.

 

Tremocos (Lupins Bar Snacks)

Most often served with beer, Tremocos are salty, pickled lupin beans. The bean has a skin, which can be removed by biting into it (and spitting out the skin) or pinching it with your fingers before popping it into your mouth.

 

Pasteis de Nata (Portuguese Custard Tart)

Egg custard tarts are a specialty in Portugal. Originating in Belem near Lisbon, Pasteis de Nata are now found throughout the country and world (especially in former Portuguese colonies, but we even ate them in Hong Kong!).

The creamy custard tarts are a must-try in Portugal – and our favorite place to get them in Porto is at Natas D’ouro. Rather than imitating the Pastel de Nata from Belem, at Natas D’ouro, they have altered the shape of the tart to resemble a traditional Porto Rabelo Boat. To truly make the treat unique to Porto, they make a custard tart topped with port wine flavor – but our favorite version is their Pastel de Nata with chocolate.

Pro Tip: There are two Natas D’ouro locations – one in Baixa (MAP) and another on the riverside in Gaia (MAP). 

 

Bola do Berlim

Born from the Berliner Pfannkuchen, the Bola do Berlim (or Berlin Balls) are unique to Portugal. Unlike the Berliner donut that is filled with jam, the Bola do Berlim is a donut cut in half, filled with Portugal’s typical sweet egg cream and topped with powered sugar.

The sweet treats are prepared both with full-size donuts and mini bite-size portions. Some are dipped in chocolate (like the ones at Molete Bread and Breakfast – MAP), but we think the best ones come from Confeitaria Serrana (MAP) near the Sao Bento train station. In the summertime, it is common for roving vendors to sell the small confections on the beach from baskets.


 

More Porto Food

 

Fresh Seafood Porto

Fresh Porto fish (usually hake, mackerel or sea bass) can be grilled, fried or steamed. Oysters, seafood rice, sardines, crustaceans and shellfish are all popular menu options at seafood restaurants in Porto.

The coastal town of Matosinhos is declared The Place to eat the best seafood in Porto (but, be aware, many restaurants are only open for lunch and dinner and close in between…like when we visited the town in the late afternoon!). For a city center, family-run spot to eat Porto seafood, Adega Mercearia Bebe Se Mal (MAP) comes highly recommended by locals.

 

Cozido a Portuguesa (Traditional Portuguese Stew)

Considered to be one of the national foods of Portugal, Cozido a Portuguesa is a mix of boiled vegetables and meats. The Porto slow food includes common ingredients like beans, potatoes, carrots, cabbage, rice, chicken, various pork parts and smoked sausages (including blood sausage). The concoction is spiced with red pepper and cinnamon.

While we did not eat Cozido a Portuguesa, we did try a similar stew called Feijoada when we visited Pinhao in the Douro Valley. We are not exactly certain of how the two stews are different, but we can confirm that Feijoada is delicious!

Another hearty and delicious stew-like dish is Rancho a Portuguese, which is sometimes found on Porto menus. The dish is made by cooking bacon, meat, pasta, chickpeas and vegetables (like cabbage, carrots and potato) in a broth. 

 

Tripas a Moda do Porto (Portuguese Tripe and Beans)

A legendary dish, Tripas a Moda do Porto is a meal of tripe, sausages and beans. The classic cuisine – from which the people of Porto get their nickname, “Tripeiros” – was invented during the Age of Discoveries. It is said that a ship was setting sail from Porto and all of the available meat was stocked on the boat, leaving only the casing behind for the people to eat. Rather than despair, the citizens created a meal of tripe, Tripas a Moda do Porto, which has been famous ever since.


 

More Porto, Portugal Best Restaurants

Classic Coffee, Majestic Cafe, Porto, Portugal

We have already highlighted our favorite places to eat in Porto, but fellow travelers looking for specialty restaurants might want to check out these places.

 

Best Breakfast in Porto, Portugal

We stayed in an Airbnb apartment during our trip to Porto – so we had a kitchen that we could use to make breakfast. However, travelers who like to eat breakfast out have many choices for places to eat breakfast in Porto.

The most popular – and one of the most expensive – Porto breakfast spots is Majestic Cafe (MAP). The landmark restaurant is considered to be one of the most beautifully decorated establishments in the city. It opened in 1921 – and is complete with chandeliers, mirrors and marble.

There is often a long wait at Majestic Cafe. If you don’t want to wait, go to Cafe A Brasileira (MAP) instead. The decor is similar, but it is less expensive and there are seldom lines.

Pro Tip: If you are looking for a hip breakfast spot, check out The Happy Nest (MAP), which comes highly recommended by our friends for both the food and outdoor space. 

 

Vegan Food Porto

Being a vegan in Porto is not easy. Meat and seafood are part of the Porto food culture. However, with an influx in tourism and a surge of healthy eating around the world, there are now a few Porto restaurants that cater to (or at least include a few options for) vegetarian and vegan diets.

Em Carne Viva (MAP), meaning Raw Flesh, is a Porto restaurant that creates traditional Portuguese food…without meat or other animal products.

 

Fast Food Porto

Not all Porto cheap eats come from bakeries…there are a handful of local and chain fast-food restaurants in Porto, too. The pork sandwiches from Casa Guedes or pizza-by-the-slice (check out Mr. Pizza – MAP) are great Porto fast food choices.

While we would never recommend going to McDonald’s, the Golden Arches on Praca da Liberdade (MAP) in the city center is actually quite unique and utterly beautiful. The space – previously home to the Imperial Cafe – is lavishly decorated with stained-glass windows and chandeliers. The opulent decor is reason enough to take a peek inside.

 

Food Delivery Porto

Although we think it is best to dine out at restaurants while visiting the city, Porto food delivery is available via Uber Eats.


 

What To Drink in Porto

Now that you know what and where to eat in Porto, we have a few tips for drinking in Porto as well!

 

Port Wine

Sipping a glass of port wine while in Porto, Portugal is almost mandatory! The drink is, after all, named after the city. Visitors can learn about the long history of port wine at one of the cellars on the south side of the Douro River in Vila Nova de Gaia.  A range of daytime cellar tours and guided tastings are available (and should be booked in advance!) but sampling the best port wines (like 40-year Tawny or a Vintage) will get pricey.

For a more comprehensive port wine experience, go on a day trip to the Douro Valley where the vineyards line the hillsides. Tours can be planned with guides in advance (like this popular tour!), but we took a day trip to the Douro Valley on our own (which we feature in our Porto Itinerary – coming soon!).

However, visitors less interested in learning and more interested in sampling have many options, too! Every restaurant, cafe and bar in town serves port wine (sometimes it is even free with the meal!). Wine Quay Bar – on the Ribeira Waterfront – offers a large selection of Port Wine, regional wine and petiscos – all with a fantastic view. However, for a quick and cheap introduction to Port, visitors can try a €5, 5-port wine tasting at one of the cafes surrounding the Mercado Beira Rio. 

 

Vinho Verde

Lesser known than port wine, Vinho Verde is another regional drink that is a must-try when in Porto. The name – Vinho Verde – translates literally to Green Wine, but really means Young Wine. The wine is meant to be consumed within 3 to 6 months of being harvested. Produced in northern Portugal, Vinho Verde wine can be red, white or rose – and is sometimes sparkling.

 

Craft Beer

The craft beer movement has been slow to catch on in Portugal, but Porto is seeing a surge of craft breweries and dedicated craft beer bars opening in the city. Read our Porto Craft Beer blog post for our tips on the best places to find craft beer in the city!


 

Porto Food Markets

Food markets are a great place to get a feel for the local cuisine. There are several food markets in Porto where visitors can get a glimpse of the regional products for sale. Some of the city markets have dedicated food courts, featuring kiosk restaurants that dish out local and international food.

 

Bolhao Food Market Porto

MAP. Dating to the late 1800s, Bolhao Market in Porto is the largest market in the city. Filled with fresh produce, fish and snack stalls, the market has long served as a central meeting point for the people of Porto for years. The building, constructed in 1914, is currently under a long renovation, so the market has temporarily moved to a nearby location.

Pro Tip: The Bolhao Food Market is one of the stops on our self-guided tour of the city. Find the complete route to more than 25 city attractions in our blog post: Porto Walking Tour – coming soon!

 

Bom Sucesso Market

MAP. The Bom Sucesso Market has a long history in the city, but has recently been revitalized into a Concept Market. In addition to the Fresh Market, where local produce is sold, there are 44 stall restaurants and numerous locally owned shops, too. The space is also used for music performances (like Fado on Sunday nights!) and workshops.

 

Mercado Beira Rio

MAP. Located along the riverfront in Gaia, Mercado Beira Rio (or Mercado Municipal de Gaia) is an excellent place to get a taste of Porto food. The recently renovated market features restaurant stalls of some of the best Porto restaurants – as well as a small produce market. A perfect place to gather with friends and sample various famous Portuguese cuisine, the market hall also has live music performances.


 

MAP: Where To Eat in Porto, Portugal


 

Porto Food Tour

Using our recommendations and provided map, it is easy to create your own Self-Guided Porto Food Tour. However, visitors who want a guide to lead the way into Porto gastronomy should join one of the top-rated food tours in Porto, Portugal.

 

Secret Food Tour Porto

Let a guide lead the way into the city’s medieval streets on a tour that will delight the taste buds. Try local specialties – including a taste of regional beer, wine and port. Reserve your spot!

 

Porto Food and Wine Tour

This 3-hour walking tour provides an introduction to the best food in Porto. Learn about the history of Porto food while sampling the local delicacies and sipping regional wine. Book it now!

 

Looking for more things to do in Porto besides just eating? We highlight the best way to spend time in the city in our blog post: A Perfect Porto Itinerary – coming soon! 

 

Start planning your trip to Portugal! Search for the lowest airfares, the best accommodations and fun things to do…then start packing!  Want more travel planning tips? Head over to our Travel Planning page for more information and tips on traveling – and for country-specific information, take a look at our Travel Guides page!

 

We Want To Know: What is your favorite Porto food? Do you have any recommendations for where to eat in Porto? Give us your best tips and advice in the comments! 

 

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Porto Food Where To Eat in Porto, Portugal by JetSettingFools.com

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